Welcome to the Chiropractic Australia  Journal Club.

The Journal Club has been established to allow busy clinicians convenient access to the latest research via Dropbox.

  • The Archive consists of approximately 3000 research articles taken primarily from the last 5 years along with some earlier key research sorted into 126 folders in DropBox.
  • The articles in each folder are sorted from newest to oldest (top to bottom).
  • The most recent articles will initially appear in the “Latest Research” folder. This folder will be added to every 2 weeks on the 1st and 15th of each month and with new articles replacing older articles which will be sorted into their relevant folders.
  • As we add new articles or sort them into folders it will automatically do the same to DropBox on your computer!
  • There is a “Submit an Article” folder so members can contribute new articles and fill the gaps with important past articles that are not yet part of the Archive!

November Paper of the Month

 

Variability in Strength, Pain, and Disability Changes in Response to an Isolated Lumbar Extension Resistance Training Intervention in Participants with Chronic Low Back Pain

 Steele J, Fisher J, Bruce-Low S, Smith D, Osborne N, Newell D

 http://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/5/4/75/htm

A comments section for discussion on this month’s article can be found at the bottom of the page. Please feel free to contribute to the discussion.

The Journal Club database can be found on the following Dropbox Link

November Paper of the Month

Variability in Strength, Pain, and Disability Changes in Response to an Isolated Lumbar Extension Resistance Training Intervention in Participants with Chronic Low Back Pain

 Steele J, Fisher J, Bruce-Low S, Smith D, Osborne N, Newell D

http://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/5/4/75/htm

 Abstract

Strengthening the lumbar extensor musculature is a common recommendation for chronic low back pain (CLBP). Although reported as effective, variability in response in CLBP populations is not well investigated. This study investigated variability in responsiveness to isolated lumbar extension (ILEX) resistance training in CLBP participants by retrospective analysis of three previous randomized controlled trials. Data from 77 participants were available for the intervention arms (males = 43, females = 34) 37 participants data (males = 20, females = 17) from the control arms. Intervention participants had all undergone 12 weeks of ILEX resistance training and changes in ILEX strength, pain (visual analogue scale; VAS), and disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured. True inter-individual (i.e., between participants) variability in response was examined through calculation of difference in the standard deviation of change scores for both control and intervention arms. Intervention participants were classified into responder status using k-means cluster analysis for ILEX strength changes and using minimal clinically important change cut-offs for VAS and ODI. Change in average ILEX strength ranged 7.6 Nm (1.9%) to 192.1 Nm (335.7%). Change in peak ILEX strength ranged −12.2 Nm (−17.5%) to 276.6 Nm (169.6%). Participants were classified for strength changes as low (n = 31), medium (n = 36), and high responders (n = 10). Change in VAS ranged 12.0 mm to −84.0 mm. Participants were classified for VAS changes as negative (n = 3), non-responders (n = 34), responders (n = 15), and high responders (n = 19). Change in ODI ranged 18 pts to −45 pts. Participants were classified for ODI changes as negative (n = 2), non-responders (n = 21), responders (n = 29), and high responders (n = 25). Considerable variation exists in response to ILEX resistance training in CLBP. Clinicians should be aware of this and future work should identify factors prognostic of successful outcomes.